SIGN UP FOR UPDATES!
Sign up for Englemed updates from TwitterSign up for Englemed updates from Facebook
ENGLEMED
Contact Englemed
Our contact email address.
We can provide a specialist, tailored health and medical news service for your site.
Click here for more information
RSS graphic XML Graphic Add to Google
About Englemed news services - services and policies.
Englemed News Blog - Ten years and counting.
Diary of a reluctant allergy sufferer - How the British National Health Service deals with allergy.
BOOKS AND GIFTS THIS WAY!
BookshopFor books on women's health, healthy eating ideas, mental health issues, diabetes, etc click here
SEARCH THIS SITE
Google

WWW Englemed
Copyright Notice. All reports, text and layout copyright Englemed Ltd, 52 Perry Avenue, Birmingham UK B42 2NE. Co Registered in England No 7053778 Some photos copyright Englemed Ltd, others may be used with permission of copyright owners.
Disclaimer: Englemed is a news service and does not provide health advice. Advice should be taken from a medical professional or appropriate health professional about any course of treatment or therapy.
FreeDigitalPhotos
www.freedigitalphotos.net
FreeWebPhotos
www.freewebphoto.com
FROM OUR NEWS FEEDS
New insights into COVID-19 infectiousness
Fri August 19th - British researchers have unveiled the first real-world study to estimate how long people are infectious with mild COVID-19. More
Gene variant that protects against heart disease
Fri August 19th - A gene variant has been identified that helps to protect against heart diseases. More
RECENT COMMENTS
On 09/10/2020 William Haworth wrote:
How long is recovery time after proceedure... on Ablation cuts atrial fibrillat...
On 08/02/2018 David Kelly wrote:
Would you like to write a piece about this to be i... on Researchers unveil new pain re...
On 23/10/2017 Cristina Pereira wrote:
https://epidemicj17.imascientist.org.uk/2017/06/21... on HIV breakthrough - MRC...
On 12/09/2017 Aparna srikantam wrote:
Brilliant finding! indeed a break through in under... on Leprosy research breakthrough...
On 01/07/2017 Annetta wrote:
I have been diagnosed with COPD for over 12 years.... on Seaweed plan for antimicrobial...
BOOKS ON WOMEN'S HEALTH
guide to breast disorders guide to womb disorders guide to menopause Complete Women's Health: from The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists For books and family gift ideas click here
OTHER NEWS OF INTEREST
WOMEN'S HEALTH NEWS FEED
RSS graphic XML Graphic
ENGLEMED HEALTH NEWS

Chickenpox virus has role in Alzheimer's Disease

Tuesday August 2nd 2022

The varicella zoster virus (VZV), which causes chickenpox and shingles, may play a role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), British researchers report today.

There has been growing evidence that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), the cold sore virus, is present in the human brain in a high proportion of older people and when it combines with a specific genetic factor it confers a high risk of developing AD.

Professor Ruth Itzhaki, of the Oxford Institute of Population Ageing, worked with the Tufts School of Engineering at the University of Medford, Mass, USA, expanded her 30-year study of viral roles in AD to include another type of herpes virus, varicella zoster virus (VZV).

They looked at if VZV can play a similar role to HSV-1 and using both laboratory-grown brain cells and a 3D brain model, the researchers investigated if VZV infection caused the accumulation of beta amyloid (A?) and abnormally phosphorylated tau (P-tau) and other AD-like features, as is the case with HSV-1.

Writing in the *Journal of Alzheimer's Disease*, they say while VZV infection of lab-grown brain cells does not lead to the formation of A? and P-tau, VZV infection resulted in both gliosis and up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines.

While this makes it unlikely that VZV could be a direct cause of AD, it suggests it has an indirect effect by reactivating dormant HSV-1.

They also found when cells containing latent HSV-1 were infected with VZV, it caused a reactivation of HSV1 as well as a dramatic increase in levels of A? and P-tau. They say this suggests severe VZV infection in humans could reactivate latent HSV-1 in brain, which could lead to formation of AD-like damage.

Prof Itzhaki, visiting professorial fellow at the Oxford Institute of Population Ageing and emeritus professor at the University of Manchester, said: “This striking result appears to confirm that, in humans, infections such as VZV can cause an increase in inflammation in the brain, which can reactivate dormant HSV-1.

“The damage in the brain by repeated infections over a lifetime would lead eventually to the development of AD/dementia.

“This would mean vaccines could play a greater role than just protecting against a single disease, because they could also indirectly, by reducing infections, provide some protection against Alzheimer’s.”

Potential involvement of Varicella Zoster Virus in Alzheimer’s Disease via reactivation of quiescent Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1. *Journal of Alzheimer's Disease* 2 August 2022

[abstract]

Tags: Brain & Neurology | Elderly Health | Flu & Viruses | Mental Health | UK News

Printer friendly page Printer friendly page

Comment on this article:

Name:
Email:
Comment:
<a>,<b> & <p> tags allowed
Please enter the letters displayed:
(not case sensitive)
CATEGORIES