SIGN UP FOR UPDATES!
Sign up for Englemed updates from TwitterSign up for Englemed updates from Facebook
ENGLEMED
Contact Englemed
Our contact email address.
We can provide a specialist, tailored health and medical news service for your site.
Click here for more information
RSS graphic XML Graphic Add to Google
About Englemed news services - services and policies.
Englemed News Blog - Ten years and counting.
Diary of a reluctant allergy sufferer - How the British National Health Service deals with allergy.
BOOKS AND GIFTS THIS WAY!
BookshopFor books on women's health, healthy eating ideas, mental health issues, diabetes, etc click here
SEARCH THIS SITE
Google

WWW Englemed
Copyright Notice. All reports, text and layout copyright Englemed Ltd, 52 Perry Avenue, Birmingham UK B42 2NE. Co Registered in England No 7053778 Some photos copyright Englemed Ltd, others may be used with permission of copyright owners.
Disclaimer: Englemed is a news service and does not provide health advice. Advice should be taken from a medical professional or appropriate health professional about any course of treatment or therapy.
FreeDigitalPhotos
www.freedigitalphotos.net
FreeWebPhotos
www.freewebphoto.com
FROM OUR NEWS FEEDS
Heart failure linked to heavy energy drink consumption
Fri April 16th - Drinking excessive energy drinks could be linked to a young man’s heart failure, according to doctors who treated a 21-year-old who consumed four cans a day for two years. More
Shift workers' heart health linked to body clock
Fri April 16th - The risk of heart disease becomes greater the more an individual works outside of their natural body clock, new research suggests. More
Infection much greater risk than vaccines for thrombotic events
Fri April 16th - Cerebral venous thrombosis has been a significant complication of COVID-19 at a rate far higher than seen after vaccination, British researchers have reported. More
RECENT COMMENTS
On 09/10/2020 William Haworth wrote:
How long is recovery time after proceedure... on Ablation cuts atrial fibrillat...
On 08/02/2018 David Kelly wrote:
Would you like to write a piece about this to be i... on Researchers unveil new pain re...
On 23/10/2017 Cristina Pereira wrote:
https://epidemicj17.imascientist.org.uk/2017/06/21... on HIV breakthrough - MRC...
On 12/09/2017 Aparna srikantam wrote:
Brilliant finding! indeed a break through in under... on Leprosy research breakthrough...
On 01/07/2017 Annetta wrote:
I have been diagnosed with COPD for over 12 years.... on Seaweed plan for antimicrobial...
BOOKS ON WOMEN'S HEALTH
guide to breast disorders guide to womb disorders guide to menopause Complete Women's Health: from The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists For books and family gift ideas click here
OTHER NEWS OF INTEREST
WOMEN'S HEALTH NEWS FEED
RSS graphic XML Graphic
ENGLEMED HEALTH NEWS

Simple baby monitoring best in childbirth

Wednesday April 7th 2021

New methods of monitoring the baby's heartbeat during labour perform no better than simpler methods in terms of ensuring safety, according to a new analysis.

The researchers, from Warwick Medical School, UK, compared the different methods of foetal surveillance that are routinely offered using a systematic review and meta-analysis.

The analysis included 33 trials with a total of 118,863 participants. A simple procedure called intermittent auscultation reduced the risk of emergency caesarean deliveries compared with other types of surveillance. This involves regular measurement of the baby’s heartbeat with a sonic aid or Doppler probe.

None of the newer methods - echocardiograms, blood tests and AI modelling - were more effective than intermittent auscultation for reducing the risk of adverse neonatal or maternal outcomes.

The team reported their study yesterday (6 April) in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Lead author, Dr Bassel Al Wattar, said: “Sadly, all the contributions we’ve done in this field for the last forty years are not yielding a significant benefit to make childbirth safer. The outcome of any labour should be a healthy mother going home with a healthy baby."

Co-author Professor Siobhan Quenby added: “We suspect that the problem with some of these monitoring methods is that they’re sending fake signals that the baby is compromised when it isn’t, and therefore a caesarean section is being performed to no clear benefit.

"It is important to note that our findings do not suggest that new monitoring methods are harmful or increasing emergency caesarean sections, but they are simply not helping to reduce them or improve childbirth safety compared to older, cheaper and widely accessible technology."

Al Wattar, B. H. et al. Effectiveness of intrapartum fetal surveillance to improve maternal and neonatal outcomes: a systematic review and network meta-analysis. Canadian Medical Association Journal 6 April 2021; doi: 10.1503/cmaj.202538

[abstract]

Tags: Childbirth and Pregnancy | Nursing & Midwifery | UK News | Women's Health & Gynaecology

Printer friendly page Printer friendly page

Comment on this article:

Name:
Email:
Comment:
<a>,<b> & <p> tags allowed
Please enter the letters displayed:
(not case sensitive)
CATEGORIES