SIGN UP FOR UPDATES!
Sign up for Englemed updates from TwitterSign up for Englemed updates from Facebook
ENGLEMED
Contact Englemed
Our contact email address.
We can provide a specialist, tailored health and medical news service for your site.
Click here for more information
RSS graphic XML Graphic Add to Google
About Englemed news services - services and policies.
Englemed News Blog - Ten years and counting.
Diary of a reluctant allergy sufferer - How the British National Health Service deals with allergy.
BOOKS AND GIFTS THIS WAY!
BookshopFor books on women's health, healthy eating ideas, mental health issues, diabetes, etc click here
SEARCH THIS SITE
Copyright Notice. All reports, text and layout copyright Englemed Ltd, 52 Perry Avenue, Birmingham UK B42 2NE. Co Registered in England No 7053778 Some photos copyright Englemed Ltd, others may be used with permission of copyright owners.
Disclaimer: Englemed is a news service and does not provide health advice. Advice should be taken from a medical professional or appropriate health professional about any course of treatment or therapy.
FreeDigitalPhotos
www.freedigitalphotos.net
FreeWebPhotos
www.freewebphoto.com
FROM OUR NEWS FEEDS
Dermatological map could lead to new treatments
Fri January 22nd - A newly created skin cell map offers a “huge leap” in understanding of disease and could pave the way for potential drug treatments for painful skin diseases, British researchers say. More
Half a million doctors needed for cancer surgery
Fri January 22nd - The world will need half a million more doctors in the next 20 years, just to cope with growing demand for cancer surgery, according to a major new analysis. More
RECENT COMMENTS
On 09/10/2020 William Haworth wrote:
How long is recovery time after proceedure... on Ablation cuts atrial fibrillat...
On 04/08/2020 VICKY P ADAM wrote:
I would like to thank WORLD HERBS CLINIC for reve... on Medieval remedy for bacterial ...
On 29/07/2020 Amdre wrote:
When i read many blogs online about cure to HSV, a... on Medieval remedy for bacterial ...
On 14/07/2020 margret wrote:
I was diagnosed of ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclero... on Heart abnormalities revealed i...
On 08/02/2018 David Kelly wrote:
Would you like to write a piece about this to be i... on Researchers unveil new pain re...
OUR CLIENTS
THIS WEEK'S STORIES
ENGLEMED HEALTH NEWS

Promising new immunotherapy for neuroblastoma

Friday November 27th 2020

A novel CAR T-cell therapy that is designed to target cancerous tumours has shown promising early results in children with neuroblastoma, according to a new study.

It is one of the first studies to demonstrate that CAR T-cells achieve rapid regression against a solid cancer and although the beneficial effects lasted for a short time, it provides important evidence that this specific CAR T-cell treatment could be used as a future treatment for children with solid cancers.

For this phase I clinical trial, researchers at the UCL Great Ormond Street Institute for Child Health (GOS ICH) and the UCL Cancer Institute, UK, modified the T-cells of 12 children with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma so that they could recognise and kill the tumour cells.

The research, published in Science Translational Medicine, is one of the first studies to demonstrate CAR T-cells achieving rapid regression against a solid cancer (non-blood cancer).

Although the beneficial effects only lasted a short time, the study provides important evidence that this specific CAR T-cell treatment could be used as a future treatment for children with solid cancers.

Existing treatment for children with an aggressive type of neuroblastoma includes surgical removal, chemotherapy with stem-cell transplant, radiotherapy and antibody therapy, but long-term survival is between 50% and 50%.

For this study, the patients’ own T-cells were modified with a CAR to target the GD2 surface protein, which is highly abundant on almost all neuroblastoma cells, but found at very low levels in healthy cells.

Researchers found that when using a sufficient dose - a minimal cell dose of 108/m2 - of the modified CAR T-cells, it induced rapid reduction in tumour size in some of the patients.

These effects were short lived but the CAR T-cells did not cause any harmful side effects in healthy tissues that express the GD2 molecule.

Lead author Dr Karin Straathof, research group leader at UCL GOS ICH and consultant paediatric oncologist at Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Trust said: “It’s encouraging to see the anti-tumour activity induced by these modified T-cells in some of the patients on this study.

“While the anti-tumour activity seen was only transient, it provides an important proof-of-principle that CAR T-cells directed at the GD2 molecule could be used against solid cancers in children.

“New treatments are needed for high-risk neuroblastoma and with more research we hope to develop this further into a treatment that results in lasting responses and increases the number of patients that can be cured.”

Senior author, Dr Martin Pule of UCL Cancer Institute, added: “Targeting of solid cancers by CAR T-cells is dependent on their infiltration and expansion within the tumour microenvironment, and thus far fewer clinical responses have been reported.

“The rapid regression in neuroblastoma cells is promising, particularly as this activity was observed in the absence of neurotoxicity which occurs with antibody-based approaches that target GD2.

“Targeting neuroblastoma with GD2 CAR T-cells appears to be a valid and safe strategy but requires further modification to promote CAR T-cell longevity.”

For the next clinical study, the research team is to look at how they can modify their approach to produce durable anti-tumour activity.

Straathof K, Pule M, Anderson J. Antitumor activity without on-target off-tumor toxicity of GD2-Chimeric Antigen Receptor T cells in patients with neuroblastoma. Science Translational Medicine 25 November 2020; doi: 10.1126/scitranslmed.abd6169

[abstract]

Tags: Cancer | Child Health | Pharmaceuticals | UK News

Printer friendly page Printer friendly page

Comment on this article:

Name:
Email:
Comment:
<a>,<b> & <p> tags allowed
Please enter the letters displayed:
(not case sensitive)
CATEGORIES