SIGN UP FOR UPDATES!
Sign up for Englemed updates from TwitterSign up for Englemed updates from Facebook
ENGLEMED
Contact Englemed
Our contact email address.
We can provide a specialist, tailored health and medical news service for your site.
Click here for more information
RSS graphic XML Graphic Add to Google
About Englemed news services - services and policies.
Englemed News Blog - Ten years and counting.
Diary of a reluctant allergy sufferer - How the British National Health Service deals with allergy.
BOOKS AND GIFTS THIS WAY!
BookshopFor books on women's health, healthy eating ideas, mental health issues, diabetes, etc click here
SEARCH THIS SITE
Copyright Notice. All reports, text and layout copyright Englemed Ltd, 52 Perry Avenue, Birmingham UK B42 2NE. Co Registered in England No 7053778 Some photos copyright Englemed Ltd, others may be used with permission of copyright owners.
Disclaimer: Englemed is a news service and does not provide health advice. Advice should be taken from a medical professional or appropriate health professional about any course of treatment or therapy.
FreeDigitalPhotos
www.freedigitalphotos.net
FreeWebPhotos
www.freewebphoto.com
FROM OUR NEWS FEEDS
Genes and apps could limit health check invites
Fri August 16th - The NHS could seek to cut the cost of screening middle-aged adults by using apps and AI, it was announced today. More
RECENT COMMENTS
On 08/02/2018 David Kelly wrote:
Would you like to write a piece about this to be i... on Researchers unveil new pain re...
On 23/10/2017 Cristina Pereira wrote:
https://epidemicj17.imascientist.org.uk/2017/06/21... on HIV breakthrough - MRC...
On 12/09/2017 Aparna srikantam wrote:
Brilliant finding! indeed a break through in under... on Leprosy research breakthrough...
On 01/07/2017 Annetta wrote:
I have been diagnosed with COPD for over 12 years.... on Seaweed plan for antimicrobial...
On 12/03/2017 Steph wrote:
The photo you have paired with this article is its... on 'Fat shaming' limits...
OUR CLIENTS
THIS WEEK'S STORIES
ENGLEMED HEALTH NEWS

Survey reveals ignorance about dying

Thursday May 9th, 2019

Public ignorance about dying increases fears about the pain and indignity associated with the event, senior medical academics say today.

Large numbers of people get information from fictional events while the most common source of knowledge about dying is from family and friends, according to a survey conducted for the Academy of Medical Sciences.

Some 20% say they have gained their knowledge from documentaries while just 22% have gained it from medical professionals.

This leads to a lack of understanding that death can be "gentle, peaceful and pain-free", according to Professor Dame Lesley Fallowfield, professor of psycho-oncology at Sussex University.

The survey found that 60% of people said they knew "just a little" about what happens at the end of life.

It was conducted by pollsters Ipsos MORI and used face to face interviews with nearly 1,000 adults. However nearly 400 of these declined to answer questions about dying.

The academy will be launching a public campaign in Lewisham, London, using a "pop up" installation called the Departure Lounge. A similar website goes live today.

Academy president Sir Robert Lechler said: "It is striking that six in ten people feel they know very little or nothing about what happens to a person at the end of life, despite half of people having been with someone when they died.

"People are as just as likely to get their information about what happens at the end of life from documentaries as they are from medical professionals, and just under half of people rely on conversations with friends and family. Without doubt this shows we need to do more to give people access to reliable information about what happens at the end of life and encourage conversations about this important topic.

"Not knowing what may happen to a loved one as they die can exacerbate fears at the hardest times of our life.

"It may also mean that people struggle to think clearly about how best to fulfil the wishes of a dying family member or friend, let alone know what to ask doctors and nurses."

Professor Fallowfield added: "TV and films rarely ever depict 'normal' deaths.

"Although grieving the loss of loved ones can be a difficult process, some people do speak about their loved one's death as having been a positive experience. We need to demystify death and talk about it more."

https://acmedsci.ac.uk/policy/policy-projects/the-departure-lounge

Tags: General Health | Pain Relief | UK News

Printer friendly page Printer friendly page

Comment on this article:

Name:
Email:
Comment:
<a>,<b> & <p> tags allowed
Please enter the letters displayed:
(not case sensitive)
CATEGORIES