SIGN UP FOR UPDATES!
Sign up for Englemed updates from TwitterSign up for Englemed updates from Facebook
ENGLEMED
Contact Englemed
Our contact email address.
We can provide a specialist, tailored health and medical news service for your site.
Click here for more information
RSS graphic XML Graphic Add to Google
About Englemed news services - services and policies.
Englemed News Blog - Ten years and counting.
Diary of a reluctant allergy sufferer - How the British National Health Service deals with allergy.
BOOKS AND GIFTS THIS WAY!
BookshopFor books on women's health, healthy eating ideas, mental health issues, diabetes, etc click here
SEARCH THIS SITE
Copyright Notice. All reports, text and layout copyright Englemed Ltd, 52 Perry Avenue, Birmingham UK B42 2NE. Co Registered in England No 7053778 Some photos copyright Englemed Ltd, others may be used with permission of copyright owners.
Disclaimer: Englemed is a news service and does not provide health advice. Advice should be taken from a medical professional or appropriate health professional about any course of treatment or therapy.
FreeDigitalPhotos
www.freedigitalphotos.net
FreeWebPhotos
www.freewebphoto.com
FROM OUR NEWS FEEDS
Call for mandatory headgear in rugby
Tues Nov 13th - Headguards should be mandatory in rugby at all levels of the game, a new study out today has concluded. More
Baby birth injuries mostly avoidable - report
Tues Nov 13th - Different care could have led to a different outcome in almost three quarters of stillbirths, neonatal deaths and severe brain injuries, according to the latest report by Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists out today. More
RECENT COMMENTS
On 08/02/2018 David Kelly wrote:
Would you like to write a piece about this to be i... on Researchers unveil new pain re...
On 23/10/2017 Cristina Pereira wrote:
https://epidemicj17.imascientist.org.uk/2017/06/21... on HIV breakthrough - MRC...
On 12/09/2017 Aparna srikantam wrote:
Brilliant finding! indeed a break through in under... on Leprosy research breakthrough...
On 01/07/2017 Annetta wrote:
I have been diagnosed with COPD for over 12 years.... on Seaweed plan for antimicrobial...
On 12/03/2017 Steph wrote:
The photo you have paired with this article is its... on 'Fat shaming' limits...
OUR CLIENTS
THIS WEEK'S STORIES
ENGLEMED HEALTH NEWS

Malaria parasite secret revealed

Tuesday September 4th, 2018

British scientists are studying a newly-found regulator protein that acts as the “master switch” in the malaria parasite, it was announced last night.

The scientists have developed new experimental approaches in order to study the AP2-G protein, they report in Nature Microbiology.

The work is being undertaken by Glasgow University and the Wellcome Sanger Institute, Cambridge.

It involved creating experimental lines of the Plasmodium parasite.

The study may lead the scientists to find ways of blocking the making of male gametocytes – which could prevent parasite reproduction.

Researcher Professor Andy Waters, from Glasgow, said: “This new experimental approach enabled us to confirm that AP2-G controls vitally important developmental pathways in gametocytes, and that it controls further gene expression and development.

“We also showed that both male and female specific genes are expressed and that blocking the expression of one of these genes resulted in parasites that could not make male gametocytes, thus ending the parasite lifecycle.”

He added: “Foremost, our work has the potential to uncover further novel biology as well as strategies that will prevent the spread of this devastating disease.”

Dr Oliver Billker, from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, said: “What led us to the breakthrough was that we designed a new experimental parasite line in which we could dial the amount of AP2-G up and down.

“By dialling AP2-G up, we managed to turn all blood stage parasites into parasites that were able to infect mosquitoes. This is how we know AP2-G is the master regulator.

“That we can now make transmission forms in larger quantity and perfect synchrony will help future research to find out how transmission works and how it can be blocked by drugs and vaccines.”

Fellow researcher Dr Katarzyna Modrzynska, also from Glasgow, said: “This study revealed how flexible the parasite development cycle is. By switching on this one gene, we could convert almost all parasites into gametocytes – something never seen in nature.

“Even the parasites that have already invaded the red blood cells and were just hours away from asexual division could change into fully functional sexual forms – an act that was previously thought to require at least one cycle of further multiplication in preparation. It shows how many mysteries the parasites are still hiding from us.”

Inducible developmental reprogramming redefines commitment to sexual development in the malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei. Nature Microbiology 4 September 2018

Tags: Africa | General Health | UK News | World Health

Printer friendly page Printer friendly page

Comment on this article:

Name:
Email:
Comment:
<a>,<b> & <p> tags allowed
Please enter the letters displayed:
(not case sensitive)
CATEGORIES