SIGN UP FOR UPDATES!
Sign up for Englemed updates from TwitterSign up for Englemed updates from Facebook
ENGLEMED
Contact Englemed
Our contact email address.
We can provide a specialist, tailored health and medical news service for your site.
Click here for more information
RSS graphic XML Graphic Add to Google
About Englemed news services - services and policies.
Englemed News Blog - Ten years and counting.
Diary of a reluctant allergy sufferer - How the British National Health Service deals with allergy.
BOOKS AND GIFTS THIS WAY!
BookshopFor books on women's health, healthy eating ideas, mental health issues, diabetes, etc click here
SEARCH THIS SITE
Google

WWW Englemed
Copyright Notice. All reports, text and layout copyright Englemed Ltd, 52 Perry Avenue, Birmingham UK B42 2NE. Co Registered in England No 7053778 Some photos copyright Englemed Ltd, others may be used with permission of copyright owners.
Disclaimer: Englemed is a news service and does not provide health advice. Advice should be taken from a medical professional or appropriate health professional about any course of treatment or therapy.
FreeDigitalPhotos
www.freedigitalphotos.net
FreeWebPhotos
www.freewebphoto.com
FROM OUR NEWS FEEDS
Heart failure ranked 'less important than potholes'
Tues June 28th - Heart failure is deemed less important than potholes in roads and pavements in the UK, according to an analysis published today. More
Cannabis users' increased risk of hospital admission
Tues June 28th - Canadian researchers have called for curbs on the globally rising levels of recreational cannabis because users have an increased risk of needing emergency care and hospital admission for any cause. More
RECENT COMMENTS
On 09/10/2020 William Haworth wrote:
How long is recovery time after proceedure... on Ablation cuts atrial fibrillat...
On 08/02/2018 David Kelly wrote:
Would you like to write a piece about this to be i... on Researchers unveil new pain re...
On 23/10/2017 Cristina Pereira wrote:
https://epidemicj17.imascientist.org.uk/2017/06/21... on HIV breakthrough - MRC...
On 12/09/2017 Aparna srikantam wrote:
Brilliant finding! indeed a break through in under... on Leprosy research breakthrough...
On 01/07/2017 Annetta wrote:
I have been diagnosed with COPD for over 12 years.... on Seaweed plan for antimicrobial...
OUR CLIENTS
THIS WEEK'S STORIES
ENGLEMED HEALTH NEWS

RA drug reduces inflammation in stroke patients

Tuesday March 27th, 2018

People in the early stages of a stroke have benefitted from an anti-inflammatory drug normally used for rheumatoid arthritis, a new research has found.

The drug, Kineret, which is licensed for treating rheumatoid arthritis, was given as a small injection just under the skin to patients.

Scientists at The University of Manchester have previously shown that the protein IL-1 increases inflammation and brain injury following a stroke.

The researchers, who have published their findings in Stroke found that Kineret blocks the actions of IL-1, which is released into the body following injury caused by a stroke.

The double-blind trial looked at ischemic strokes only and involved 80 participants in the study, which was carried out at Salford’s Greater Manchester Stroke Centre at Salford Royal.

Patients were wither given six doses of the drug or placebo over three days. The first dose was given within six hours after the onset of the stroke symptoms.

Inflammatory markers were measured in the blood before treatment began and during study treatment.

Professor Craig Smith, of The University of Manchester and Salford Royal, said: “Though strokes affect different people in different ways, for many people they have a devastating effect on their long-term health and wellbeing.

“Excessive inflammation after a stroke is known to be harmful and predicts a worse outcome in patients.

“We have shown that Kineret injections, started within six hours of stroke onset significantly reduces levels of inflammation in patients.”

Hilary Reynolds, executive director of strategy and research at the Stroke Association, which funded the study, added: “This study builds on evidence that IL-1Ra (Kineret) helps to reduce inflammation and brain damage in a wide range of stroke patients soon after a stroke.

“The drug can be given quickly, via injection or via a drip. This means that it can be used in different settings, for example, it could potentially be given in ambulances on the way to hospital.

“The brain loses around 2 million brain cells every minute during a stroke, so this could provide a major step forward in fast and effective treatment of stroke.

“The research has not yet proven that this drug can reduce patient disability after stroke. However, if further trials are successful, we hope it could vastly improve outcomes and quality of life for people who have had a stroke.”

Further research is needed to see if Kineret is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke and if it can be given alongside current treatments such as clot-busting drugs.

Smith C, Hulme S, Vail A et al. Subcutaneous interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in ischemic stroke : a randomized controlled phase 2 trial. Stroke March 2018; doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.118.020750.

Tags: A&E | Brain & Neurology | Pharmaceuticals | UK News

Printer friendly page Printer friendly page

Comment on this article:

Name:
Email:
Comment:
<a>,<b> & <p> tags allowed
Please enter the letters displayed:
(not case sensitive)
CATEGORIES