SIGN UP FOR UPDATES!
Sign up for Englemed updates from TwitterSign up for Englemed updates from Facebook
ENGLEMED
Contact Englemed
Our contact email address.
We can provide a specialist, tailored health and medical news service for your site.
Click here for more information
RSS graphic XML Graphic Add to Google
About Englemed news services - services and policies.
Englemed News Blog - Ten years and counting.
Diary of a reluctant allergy sufferer - How the British National Health Service deals with allergy.
BOOKS AND GIFTS THIS WAY!
BookshopFor books on women's health, healthy eating ideas, mental health issues, diabetes, etc click here
SEARCH THIS SITE
Copyright Notice. All reports, text and layout copyright Englemed Ltd, 52 Perry Avenue, Birmingham UK B42 2NE. Co Registered in England No 7053778 Some photos copyright Englemed Ltd, others may be used with permission of copyright owners.
Disclaimer: Englemed is a news service and does not provide health advice. Advice should be taken from a medical professional or appropriate health professional about any course of treatment or therapy.
FreeDigitalPhotos
www.freedigitalphotos.net
FreeWebPhotos
www.freewebphoto.com
FROM OUR NEWS FEEDS
Global challenges for women with ovarian cancer
Fri Oct 19th - Most women with ovarian cancer had never heard of the disease before they were diagnosed, a global study has revealed. More
Women face more chemotherapy side-effects
Fri Oct 19th - Women being treated for oesophageal and stomach cancer may experience certain chemotherapy side-effects more often than men, according to analysis published last night. More
RECENT COMMENTS
On 08/02/2018 David Kelly wrote:
Would you like to write a piece about this to be i... on Researchers unveil new pain re...
On 23/10/2017 Cristina Pereira wrote:
https://epidemicj17.imascientist.org.uk/2017/06/21... on HIV breakthrough - MRC...
On 12/09/2017 Aparna srikantam wrote:
Brilliant finding! indeed a break through in under... on Leprosy research breakthrough...
On 01/07/2017 Annetta wrote:
I have been diagnosed with COPD for over 12 years.... on Seaweed plan for antimicrobial...
On 12/03/2017 Steph wrote:
The photo you have paired with this article is its... on 'Fat shaming' limits...
OUR CLIENTS
THIS WEEK'S STORIES
ENGLEMED HEALTH NEWS

New stem cell trial for Crohn's patients

Monday August 6th, 2018

A new UK trial is to test the use of stem cell transplants to grow new immune systems for people with untreatable Crohn’s disease, was announced today.

Researchers hope that if the ASTIClite’ clinical trial is successful, resetting the immune system could reduce gut inflammation and help those for whom other treatments have not worked.

It follows the 2015 'ASTIC’ trial, which investigated a similar stem cell therapy. Although the original trial did not cure the disease, the team found that many patients benefitted from the treatment.

However, there were also some serious side effects from the doses of drugs used. This new trial will use a lower dose of the treatment to minimise risks due to toxicity.

Chief investigator Professor James Lindsay from Queen Mary University of London and a consultant at Barts Health NHS Trust said: “Despite the introduction of new drugs, there are still many patients who don’t respond, or gradually lose response, to all available treatments.

“Although surgery with the formation of a stoma may be an option that allows patients to return to normal daily activities, it is not suitable in some and others may not want to consider this approach.

“We’re hoping that by completely resetting the patient’s immune system through a stem cell transplant, we might be able to radically alter the course of the disease. While it may not be a cure, it may allow some patients to finally respond to drugs which previously did not work.”

The trial, which follows a successful study in which stem cell transplants treated people with multiple sclerosis, will see patients undergoing chemotherapy and hormone treatment to mobilise their stem cells, which are then harvested from their blood.

Further chemotherapy kills their faulty immune system and stem cells are re-introduced back into the body, they develop into new immune cells which give the patient a fresh immune system.

It is hoped the new immune system will not react adversely to the patient’s own gut.

Professor Tom Walley, director of the NIHR Evaluation, Trials and Studies programmes, which funded the £2 million trial with the Medical Research Council, said: “Stem cell therapies are an important, active and growing area of research with great potential. There are early findings showing a role for stem cells in replacing damaged tissue. In Crohn’s disease this approach could offer real benefits for the clinical care and long term health of patients.”

The trial is being led by Queen Mary University of London and Barts Health NHS trust and will involve academics from the University of Manchester, University of Nottingham, University of Sheffield, Nottingham Trent University, University of Edinburgh, University of Oxford, and King’s College London.

Tags: Gastroenterology | UK News

Printer friendly page Printer friendly page

Comment on this article:

Name:
Email:
Comment:
<a>,<b> & <p> tags allowed
Please enter the letters displayed:
(not case sensitive)
CATEGORIES