SIGN UP FOR UPDATES!
Sign up for Englemed updates from TwitterSign up for Englemed updates from Facebook
ENGLEMED
Contact Englemed
Our contact email address.
We can provide a specialist, tailored health and medical news service for your site.
Click here for more information
RSS graphic XML Graphic Add to Google
About Englemed news services - services and policies.
Englemed News Blog - Ten years and counting.
Diary of a reluctant allergy sufferer - How the British National Health Service deals with allergy.
BOOKS AND GIFTS THIS WAY!
BookshopFor books on women's health, healthy eating ideas, mental health issues, diabetes, etc click here
SEARCH THIS SITE
Google

WWW Englemed
Copyright Notice. All reports, text and layout copyright Englemed Ltd, 52 Perry Avenue, Birmingham UK B42 2NE. Co Registered in England No 7053778 Some photos copyright Englemed Ltd, others may be used with permission of copyright owners.
Disclaimer: Englemed is a news service and does not provide health advice. Advice should be taken from a medical professional or appropriate health professional about any course of treatment or therapy.
FreeDigitalPhotos
www.freedigitalphotos.net
FreeWebPhotos
www.freewebphoto.com
FROM OUR NEWS FEEDS
How heart failure risk rises after surgery
Wed June 29th - The development of atrial fibrillation following surgery is an important risk factor for heart failure, researchers report today. More
Brain surgery benefits intracranial pressure
Wed June 29th - Craniectomy for intracranial hypertension offers significant benefit, according to new guidance, triggered by British research. More
RECENT COMMENTS
On 09/10/2020 William Haworth wrote:
How long is recovery time after proceedure... on Ablation cuts atrial fibrillat...
On 08/02/2018 David Kelly wrote:
Would you like to write a piece about this to be i... on Researchers unveil new pain re...
On 23/10/2017 Cristina Pereira wrote:
https://epidemicj17.imascientist.org.uk/2017/06/21... on HIV breakthrough - MRC...
On 12/09/2017 Aparna srikantam wrote:
Brilliant finding! indeed a break through in under... on Leprosy research breakthrough...
On 01/07/2017 Annetta wrote:
I have been diagnosed with COPD for over 12 years.... on Seaweed plan for antimicrobial...
OUR CLIENTS
THIS WEEK'S STORIES
ENGLEMED HEALTH NEWS

Ulcer drug for depression?

Thursday June 1st, 2017

A medicine prescribed for gastric ulcers may benefit people with depression via its effect on a protein called brain-derived neurotrophic factor, researchers reported last night.

This protein is important in the nervous system as it supports existing neurons and encourages new ones to grow. Previous studies have found that this protein may be involved in the reported anti-depressant-like effects of teprenone, a widely-used anti-ulcer drug.

Teprenone - chemical name geranylgeranylacetone - has been reported to have protective effects in the central nervous system, perhaps because it triggers the production of heat shock proteins in the hippocampus.

Heat shock proteins help other proteins to stabilise or refold, and are associated with various behavioural disorders, but their exact role in depression remains unclear.

Dr Naoya Hashikawa and colleagues at Okayama University, Japan, looked at the effects of teprenone on mice with depression-like behaviour. They found that the drug increased expression of heat shock protein 105 in the hippocampus of the mice, and reversed depression-like behaviour and the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

The team add in the open-access journal Science Advances today (31 May) that the results show that inhibiting brain-derived neurotrophic factor receptors "prevented teprenone's anti-depressant-like effects".

The team also examined information on teprenone from the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System.

Reports from doctors and patients suggested that teprenone "helped alleviate drug-induced depression in some patients". They write: "Taken together, the findings indicate that teprenone's heat shock protein-inducing properties may prove to be a novel therapeutic strategy for depression."

Hashikawa, N. et al. HSP105 prevents depression-like behavior by increasing hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in mice. Science Advances 31 May 2017 [abstract]

Tags: Asia | Gastroenterology | Mental Health | Pharmaceuticals

Printer friendly page Printer friendly page

Comment on this article:

Name:
Email:
Comment:
<a>,<b> & <p> tags allowed
Please enter the letters displayed:
(not case sensitive)
CATEGORIES