SIGN UP FOR UPDATES!
Sign up for Englemed updates from TwitterSign up for Englemed updates from Facebook
ENGLEMED
Contact Englemed
Our contact email address.
We can provide a specialist, tailored health and medical news service for your site.
Click here for more information
RSS graphic XML Graphic Add to Google
About Englemed news services - services and policies.
Englemed News Blog - Ten years and counting.
Diary of a reluctant allergy sufferer - How the British National Health Service deals with allergy.
BOOKS AND GIFTS THIS WAY!
BookshopFor books on women's health, healthy eating ideas, mental health issues, diabetes, etc click here
SEARCH THIS SITE
Google

WWW Englemed
Copyright Notice. All reports, text and layout copyright Englemed Ltd, 52 Perry Avenue, Birmingham UK B42 2NE. Co Registered in England No 7053778 Some photos copyright Englemed Ltd, others may be used with permission of copyright owners.
Disclaimer: Englemed is a news service and does not provide health advice. Advice should be taken from a medical professional or appropriate health professional about any course of treatment or therapy.
FreeDigitalPhotos
www.freedigitalphotos.net
FreeWebPhotos
www.freewebphoto.com
FROM OUR NEWS FEEDS
Heart failure ranked 'less important than potholes'
Tues June 28th - Heart failure is deemed less important than potholes in roads and pavements in the UK, according to an analysis published today. More
Cannabis users' increased risk of hospital admission
Tues June 28th - Canadian researchers have called for curbs on the globally rising levels of recreational cannabis because users have an increased risk of needing emergency care and hospital admission for any cause. More
RECENT COMMENTS
On 09/10/2020 William Haworth wrote:
How long is recovery time after proceedure... on Ablation cuts atrial fibrillat...
On 08/02/2018 David Kelly wrote:
Would you like to write a piece about this to be i... on Researchers unveil new pain re...
On 23/10/2017 Cristina Pereira wrote:
https://epidemicj17.imascientist.org.uk/2017/06/21... on HIV breakthrough - MRC...
On 12/09/2017 Aparna srikantam wrote:
Brilliant finding! indeed a break through in under... on Leprosy research breakthrough...
On 01/07/2017 Annetta wrote:
I have been diagnosed with COPD for over 12 years.... on Seaweed plan for antimicrobial...
OUR CLIENTS
THIS WEEK'S STORIES
ENGLEMED HEALTH NEWS

Britons underestimate alcohol intake

Friday February 8th, 2013

Some people in Britain may be drinking nearly twice as much alcohol as they think they are, according to a government-backed study revealed yesterday.

Researchers found that some people underestimated the amount they drink by as much as 40%.

The figures come from detailed research conducted with 19 volunteers.

Government officials said the findings reflected national surveys which find that most heavy drinkers think their intake is "moderate" - and most do not intend to cut down.

Yesterday a new phase of the national Change4Life campaign was launched - encouraging people to use an on-line app to check their drinking.

Chief Medical Officer Professor Dame Sally Davies said: "I understand that people enjoy having a glass of wine or beer to unwind at the end of a busy day – but these drinks stack up and can increase your risk of high blood pressure, cancer or liver disease."

Meanwhile a second study suggests that increasing the price of alcohol can make a big difference to cutting deaths linked to alcohol.

The research from British Columbia, Canada, showed that a 10% increase in the regional minimum price of alcohol was linked to a one third reduction in deaths.

The change came about at the same time as private stores were allowed to sell alcohol for the first time.

Writing in the journal Addiction, the researchers say every 10% increase in numbers of private stores selling drink was linked to a 2% increase in serious alcohol problems.

Researcher Dr Tim Stockwell, director of the University of Victoria’s Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia, said: "This study adds to the scientific evidence that, despite popular opinion to the contrary, even the heaviest drinkers reduce their consumption when minimum alcohol prices increase.

"It is hard otherwise to explain the significant changes in alcohol-related deaths observed in British Columbia."

The relationship between changes to minimum alcohol prices, outlet densities and alcohol attributable deaths in British Columbia in 2002-2009. Addiction 7 February 2013; 108: doi:  10.1111/add.12139

Tags: Cancer | Drug & Alcohol Abuse | Internal Medicine | North America | UK News

Printer friendly page Printer friendly page

Comment on this article:

Name:
Email:
Comment:
<a>,<b> & <p> tags allowed
Please enter the letters displayed:
(not case sensitive)
CATEGORIES