SIGN UP FOR UPDATES!
Sign up for Englemed updates from TwitterSign up for Englemed updates from Facebook
ENGLEMED
Contact Englemed
Our contact email address.
We can provide a specialist, tailored health and medical news service for your site.
Click here for more information
RSS graphic XML Graphic Add to Google
About Englemed news services - services and policies.
Englemed News Blog - Ten years and counting.
Diary of a reluctant allergy sufferer - How the British National Health Service deals with allergy.
BOOKS AND GIFTS THIS WAY!
BookshopFor books on women's health, healthy eating ideas, mental health issues, diabetes, etc click here
SEARCH THIS SITE
Copyright Notice. All reports, text and layout copyright Englemed Ltd, 52 Perry Avenue, Birmingham UK B42 2NE. Co Registered in England No 7053778 Some photos copyright Englemed Ltd, others may be used with permission of copyright owners.
Disclaimer: Englemed is a news service and does not provide health advice. Advice should be taken from a medical professional or appropriate health professional about any course of treatment or therapy.
FreeDigitalPhotos
www.freedigitalphotos.net
FreeWebPhotos
www.freewebphoto.com
FROM OUR NEWS FEEDS
Teens and deprived mothers missing postnatal checks
Tues November 24th - More than 350,000 women in the UK are likely to be missing key postnatal check-ups, according to the largest study of its kind published today. More
New immunotherapy could herald better cancer treatments
Tues November 24th - A new type of immunotherapy has been developed that could pave the way for more cancer treatment options, it was revealed last night (22 November 2020). More
RECENT COMMENTS
On 09/10/2020 William Haworth wrote:
How long is recovery time after proceedure... on Ablation cuts atrial fibrillat...
On 04/08/2020 VICKY P ADAM wrote:
I would like to thank WORLD HERBS CLINIC for reve... on Medieval remedy for bacterial ...
On 29/07/2020 Amdre wrote:
When i read many blogs online about cure to HSV, a... on Medieval remedy for bacterial ...
On 14/07/2020 margret wrote:
I was diagnosed of ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclero... on Heart abnormalities revealed i...
On 08/02/2018 David Kelly wrote:
Would you like to write a piece about this to be i... on Researchers unveil new pain re...
BOOKS ON WOMEN'S HEALTH
guide to breast disorders guide to womb disorders guide to menopause Complete Women's Health: from The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists For books and family gift ideas click here
OTHER NEWS OF INTEREST
WOMEN'S HEALTH NEWS FEED
RSS graphic XML Graphic
ENGLEMED HEALTH NEWS

Parental jobs and chemical exposure linked to birth defects

Wednesday July 18th, 2012

Computer scientists, landscapers and artists are among men whose jobs may contribute to an increased risk for their children, researchers warned today.

Researchers, led by Dr Andrew Olshan of the University of North Carolina, USA, explain that previous research has linked certain careers with birth defects, but different types of defects and occupations have been grouped together, giving unclear results.

The new study used figures from the US National Birth Defects Prevention Study to compare father's occupation in 9,998 cases of birth defects against those in 4,066 other babies. Results showed that several occupations were linked with an increased rate of birth defects.

Such jobs included mathematical, physical and computer scientists, artists, photographers and photo processors, food service workers, landscapers and groundskeepers, hairdressers and cosmetologists, office and administrative support workers, sawmill workers, petroleum and gas workers, chemical worker, printers, material moving equipment operators, and motor vehicle operators.

In the journal Occupational and Environmental Medicine today (July 18), the authors say they hope: "Findings from this study might be used to identify specific occupations worthy of further investigation".

Another study in the same journal confirmed earlier findings that women's workplace exposure to organic solvents is linked to birth defects affecting the heart.

These solvents are widely used and are found in paints, varnishes, adhesives, degreasing/cleaning agents, dyes, and agricultural products. They enter the body through the lungs, mouth or skin.

Figures on 4,998 women living in the US showed that exposure to organic solvents in the month before conception up to early pregnancy "is a potential risk factor for several types of heart defects at birth".

Dr Suzanne Gilboa of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, USA, and her team call for more work on specific exposure/heart defect combinations.

Paternal occupation and birth defects: findings from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. Desrosiers, T. A. et al. Occupational and Environmental Medicine July 18 2012 doi: 10.1136/oemed-2011-100372.

Association between maternal occupational exposure to organic solvents and congenital heart defects, National Birth Defects Prevention Study, 1997-2002. Gilboa, S. M. et al. Occupational and Environmental Medicine July 18 2012 doi 10.1136/oemed-2011-100536.

Tags: Child Health | Childbirth and Pregnancy | Menís Health | North America | Womenís Health & Gynaecology

Printer friendly page Printer friendly page

Comment on this article:

Name:
Email:
Comment:
<a>,<b> & <p> tags allowed
Please enter the letters displayed:
(not case sensitive)
CATEGORIES