SIGN UP FOR UPDATES!
Sign up for Englemed updates from TwitterSign up for Englemed updates from Facebook
ENGLEMED
Contact Englemed
Our contact email address.
We can provide a specialist, tailored health and medical news service for your site.
Click here for more information
RSS graphic XML Graphic Add to Google
About Englemed news services - services and policies.
Englemed News Blog - Ten years and counting.
Diary of a reluctant allergy sufferer - How the British National Health Service deals with allergy.
BOOKS AND GIFTS THIS WAY!
BookshopFor books on women's health, healthy eating ideas, mental health issues, diabetes, etc click here
SEARCH THIS SITE
Google

WWW Englemed
Copyright Notice. All reports, text and layout copyright Englemed Ltd, 52 Perry Avenue, Birmingham UK B42 2NE. Co Registered in England No 7053778 Some photos copyright Englemed Ltd, others may be used with permission of copyright owners.
Disclaimer: Englemed is a news service and does not provide health advice. Advice should be taken from a medical professional or appropriate health professional about any course of treatment or therapy.
FreeDigitalPhotos
www.freedigitalphotos.net
FreeWebPhotos
www.freewebphoto.com
FROM OUR NEWS FEEDS
How heart failure risk rises after surgery
Wed June 29th - The development of atrial fibrillation following surgery is an important risk factor for heart failure, researchers report today. More
Brain surgery benefits intracranial pressure
Wed June 29th - Craniectomy for intracranial hypertension offers significant benefit, according to new guidance, triggered by British research. More
RECENT COMMENTS
On 09/10/2020 William Haworth wrote:
How long is recovery time after proceedure... on Ablation cuts atrial fibrillat...
On 08/02/2018 David Kelly wrote:
Would you like to write a piece about this to be i... on Researchers unveil new pain re...
On 23/10/2017 Cristina Pereira wrote:
https://epidemicj17.imascientist.org.uk/2017/06/21... on HIV breakthrough - MRC...
On 12/09/2017 Aparna srikantam wrote:
Brilliant finding! indeed a break through in under... on Leprosy research breakthrough...
On 01/07/2017 Annetta wrote:
I have been diagnosed with COPD for over 12 years.... on Seaweed plan for antimicrobial...
BOOKS ON WOMEN'S HEALTH
guide to breast disorders guide to womb disorders guide to menopause Complete Women's Health: from The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists For books and family gift ideas click here
OTHER NEWS OF INTEREST
WOMEN'S HEALTH NEWS FEED
RSS graphic XML Graphic
ENGLEMED HEALTH NEWS

Daily iron supplements not necessary during pregnancy

Wednesday July 11th, 2012

Pregnant women who take daily iron supplements may benefit just as much from reducing them to once a week, new research suggests.

Dr Juan Pablo Pena-Rosas of the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland, and colleagues carried out a Cochrane review of the evidence to date.

They explain that a lack of iron can cause anaemia in pregnant women, potentially increasing the risk of childbirth complications and causing harm to the baby. Equally, too much iron in the blood may increase the risk of prematurity or low birthweight.

Daily iron supplements are recommended for all pregnant women in some countries, and for those with anaemia in the UK.

The review examined figures from 18 trials of a total of 4,072 pregnant women who took either preventative iron supplements alone, with folic acid, or with multi-vitamins and minerals.

Those who took iron supplements once, twice or three times a week were at no higher risk of anaemia by the end of their pregnancy than those who took them daily. Their babies were no more likely to be premature or have a low birth weight. These women were also less likely to experience side-effects such as nausea, constipation and excessively high blood iron levels.

Dr Pena-Rosas says: "Intermittent iron supplementation could be considered as a feasible alternative to daily supplementation for preventing anaemia during pregnancy, particularly in developed countries where anaemia in pregnancy is not a public health problem and there is good antenatal care for monitoring anaemia status."

But he added: "At the moment evidence is limited and the quality of the trials included in our review was generally low."

The team call for further research to clarify which iron doses during pregnancy are safest for both mother and baby.

Intermittent oral iron supplementation during pregnancy. Pena-Rosas, J. P. et al. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 7.doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD009997.

Tags: Childbirth and Pregnancy | Europe | Nursing & Midwifery | Pharmaceuticals | Women’s Health & Gynaecology

Printer friendly page Printer friendly page

Comment on this article:

Name:
Email:
Comment:
<a>,<b> & <p> tags allowed
Please enter the letters displayed:
(not case sensitive)
CATEGORIES